• NOT CLEANING YOUR GRILL
    To prevent your food from tasting like gritty, charred residue, brush off the grill surface after each use while it’s still hot. Then, spray a coating of canola oil on the grill grates to extend their life.
  • USING LOW QUALITY MEAT
    Life is too short for low-quality meat. High quality meat makes a huge difference on the grill. Look for even marbling in beef.
  • PUTTING COLD MEAT ON THE GRILL
    Putting cold meat on the grill makes cooking it evenly really difficult. Let the meat sit out for at least a half hour for most cuts and up to an hour for thicker cuts.
  • OVER-SEASONING MEAT
    Keep the seasoning simple. You don’t want to obscure the flavor of the meat with too many ingredients.
  • NOT PREHEATING YOUR GRILL
    Preheating the grill is crucial. Don’t rush getting the coals prepared or you will burn your food. Be patient and let the coals turn gray before adding the meat. Using a grilling chimney to start the coals can be a big help.
  • USING LIGHTER FLUID
    Nobody likes gasoline-scented burger bites. Resist the temptation for instant flames from lighter fluid and opt instead for the old school method of using crumpled newspaper to start your fire.
  • GRILLING TOO HOT
    Set up two temperature zones on the grill by adding coals to one half of the grill instead of the entire grill. Try cooking the meat over indirect heat first then shift it over to the hot side to brown it at the end.
  • NOT CONTROLLING THE FIRE
    Don’t overcrowd the grill grate. You should keep one-fourth of the grill free so you have a spot to move food if you have flare-ups.
  • NOT HAVING A THERMOMETER
    Don’t overcook the meat. Use a meat thermometer, and pull the meat off the grill as soon as it reaches the proper temperature. Be sure to let the meat rest for around 5 minutes for the average sized cut and about 30 minutes for roasts.
  • ADDING SAUCE TOO EARLY
    Do not add the sauce early! Barbeque sauces often contain sugars that begin to burn at 260 degrees. Wait until the meat is 10 minutes from completion before brushing on the sauce.
  • POKING OR PRESSING THE MEAT
    Don’t poke the meat to check its doneness. Invest in a digital thermometer and you’ll have perfect meat every time.
  • NOT USING THE LID PROPERLY
    Using the lid conserves the heat needed to cook the food, holds in flavorful smoke, and helps prevent flare-ups. Resist the temptation to continually lift the lid, and just leave it alone.

GRANT’S VISUAL GUIDE TO BBQ

SHRINKAGE

Ribs are ready to pull off the heat when the pork draws back about one-half inch from the end of the rib bone.

JUICINESS

The rib bones should be colored off-white and have a little fatty sheen. Dry, pure white bones are a sign of over-cooked ribs.

TENDERNESS

You’ve got a perfectly cooked pork shoulder when you’re able to grab the blade bone and gently slide it out of the meat.